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Tim Hall has done it again! He has just released the 2nd edition of "Max Power".
Rather than get into details here, I urge you to check out this announcement post.
It's a massive upgrade, and well worth checking out. -E

 

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Thread: HPE DL360 Gen9

  1. #1
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    Default HPE DL360 Gen9

    We've been running these Open Servers with no issues - however I'm now required to look at adding 10GB capacity.
    The HCL lists this as an valid add-on PCI card : https://www.checkpoint.com/support-s...60sfp-adapter/

    However since I've used all my available PCI-E slots - the FlexibleLOM module (bottom left) is what I have available for expansion.
    I can buy the same network card in the 560SFP+ chipset in this format, but it's not listed on the HCL.

    Has anyone used HPE servers with FlexibleLOM modules with success or not?
    In this case: https://h20195.www2.hpe.com/v2/GetPD.../c04111435.pdf

    Thanks,
    John
    Last edited by johna8; 2018-06-08 at 17:41.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: HPE DL360 Gen9

    The "FlexibleLOM" slot is just a PCI slot with a non-standard connector. The cards I have seen for it use the same chips as the same-name ordinary PCIe cards. As long as you can return them if they don't work, I would go for it.

    Of course, you can also get a Mellanox dual-port 40g PCIe card for about $1k. That could free up some of your PCIe slots.
    Zimmie

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    Default Re: HPE DL360 Gen9

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob_Zimmerman View Post
    The "FlexibleLOM" slot is just a PCI slot with a non-standard connector. The cards I have seen for it use the same chips as the same-name ordinary PCIe cards. As long as you can return them if they don't work, I would go for it.

    Of course, you can also get a Mellanox dual-port 40g PCIe card for about $1k. That could free up some of your PCIe slots.
    Thanks - yes they are the same chip as listed on the HCL - just not the part number itself given it's an different SKU item.
    I was just hoping to hear from any real scenarios with people sitting just outside what the HCL mentions that's all.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: HPE DL360 Gen9

    All Check Point cares about is the card’s PCI ID. If it uses the same chip, it’s the same card, regardless of the physical connector. That’s how Check Point themselves get away with using weird, proprietary slots on their junky “appliances”.
    Zimmie

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    Default Re: HPE DL360 Gen9

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob_Zimmerman View Post
    All Check Point cares about is the card’s PCI ID. If it uses the same chip, it’s the same card, regardless of the physical connector. That’s how Check Point themselves get away with using weird, proprietary slots on their junky “appliances”.
    Thanks Bob for the input - will get my hands on one of the modules to give it a go.

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    Default Re: HPE DL360 Gen9

    Last one turns out the Broadcom NICs were are using are average.
    Anyone else used the HP 366T 4 port cards on the HP servers does it support multi queue?

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    Default Re: HPE DL360 Gen9

    Quote Originally Posted by johna8 View Post
    Last one turns out the Broadcom NICs were are using are average.
    Anyone else used the HP 366T 4 port cards on the HP servers does it support multi queue?
    Looks like the 366T is just a rebadged Intel® Ethernet Controller I350-AM4, looking at the data sheet for that chipset it does indeed support Multi-Queue for up to 8 queues just like most Intel NIC hardware.

    "Average" is not the term I would use to describe Broadcom NICs, I'd prefer "total junk" instead.
    --
    Second Edition of my "Max Power" Firewall Book
    Now Available at http://www.maxpowerfirewalls.com

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    Default Re: HPE DL360 Gen9

    Quote Originally Posted by ShadowPeak.com View Post
    Looks like the 366T is just a rebadged Intel® Ethernet Controller I350-AM4, looking at the data sheet for that chipset it does indeed support Multi-Queue for up to 8 queues just like most Intel NIC hardware.

    "Average" is not the term I would use to describe Broadcom NICs, I'd prefer "total junk" instead.
    Thanks unfortunately I have 4 onboard which are Broadcom.
    Is it OK to use for sync traffic etc or I think your preference is to disable these in BIOS ?
    Would need to see if I can do this given I use all 12 ports so far.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: HPE DL360 Gen9

    Broadcom should be okay for low-risk traffic. For example, it should be fine for management interfaces. I think sync should be fine, too, since it's a small number of high-volume connections. I don't really have a good understanding of what is wrong with Broadcom interfaces, though.

    If you're going to have to move your interfaces around, I highly, highly recommend moving from directly using physical ports to using bonds instead. Using bonds lets you easily rearrange how your logical interfaces work on your hardware. This is more important with VSX, as moving a lot of VLANs from one interface to another on VSX is a bit of a pain.
    Zimmie

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